The portrayal of hester prynne through the eyes of the puritans in the scarlet letter

Thus, the customhouse is portrayed as an institution that embodies many of the principles that America supposedly opposes. She then removes her cap, letting her beautiful, glossy brown hair shine in the rays of the forest sunlight.

She had changed so much after she had taken the first step onto the Boston scaffold. Church and State Those who were male and members of the church could vote. The Puritans were truly a people governed by God. Then let the magistrates, who have made it of no effect, thank themselves if their own wives and daughters go astray!

Why does she repeatedly refuse to stop wearing the letter? Their dress, their behavior, and even the happiness on their faces is very un-Puritan-like. The only escape from public scrutiny is the forest.

Yet, people have short memories and, years after a fact, even the hardest of hearts is able to recognize when anyone, whether good or bad, has made something good out of their past bad deeds.

The irony of public appearance and private knowledge are themes throughout this story. A group of them fled to Holland and subsequently to the New World, where they hoped to build a society, described by John Winthrop, as "a city upon a hill" — a place where the "eyes of all people are upon us.

Then, the big day came, and Hester was gleaming with joy in anticipation of a new life without ridicule or guilt. But it is this project of defining America that Hawthorne himself partially undertakes in his novel.

These attempts are failed, for Arthur Dimmesdale, the father and minister of Hester Prynne, insists that the child is a bond, a necessity of the young woman who has nothing if she does not have the child.

There, anonymity can protect an individual and allow him or her to assume a new identity. Man and Salvation These early Puritans followed the writings of a French Protestant reformer named John Calvinwhose teachings saw the world as a grim conflict between God and Satan. He mentions that the magistrates may let her remove the scarlet letter, but she declines.

Later in the novel, we discover that Arthur Dimmesdale is the confidential lover. What can thy silence do for him, except to tempt him — yea, compel him, as it were — to add hypocrisy to sin? Soon the drama unfolds as Chillingworth discovers that the trio are boarding a boat across the sea after the Election Day, and he books himself up to travel with them, since he is obsessed with torturing Dimmesdale.

Her child, Pearl, is a devilish, impish, child, that is indifferent to the strict Puritan society. The Puritans in this book are constantly seeking out natural symbols, which they claim are messages from God. Hester chooses to continue to wear the letter because she is determined to transform its meaning through her actions and her own self-perception—she wants to be the one who controls its meaning.

The meteor that streaks the sky as Dimmesdale stands on the scaffold in Chapter 12 is a good example of this phenomenon. On the other hand, the society built by the Puritans was stern and repressive, with little room for individualism.

How did the Puritan society view Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter?

Obviously, these rigid Puritan standards had both good and bad outcomes. She has made herself into a symbol of feminine repression and charitable ideals, and she stands as a self-appointed reminder of the evils society can commit.

In The Scarlet Letter, those two branches of the government are represented by Mr. In their opinion, wearing a scarlet letter "A" is not enough. These stern and introspective Puritans provided a rigid structure that was repressive to the individual but that enabled the colony to survive those early years when order and faith were needed.

The scaffold is a painful task to bear; the townspeople gathered around to gossip and stare at Hester and her newborn child, whom she suitably named Pearl, named because of her extreme value to her mother. And, in fact, she says, "Many a church-member saw I, walking behind the music, that has danced in the same measure with me.

Character Analysis of Hester Prynne

The view of Hester has greatly changed in the seven years after she was first sentenced to wear the letter.The Scarlet Letter: Hester Prynne The character of Hester Prynne changed significantly throughout the novel "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Hester Prynne, through the eyes of the Puritans, is an extreme sinner; she has gone against the Puritan ways, committing adultery. what punishment would the puritan women have given Hester Prynne if it were left to them?

Scalded with a hot iron on her forehead to mark her as a "hussy" a immoral woman Describe the appearance of Hester Prynne. Everything you ever wanted to know about Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter, written by masters of this stuff Pearl, through sewing and embroidery, but they're not exactly living the Real Housewives of she basically rolls her eyes and asks him who said anything about going by himself—she's planning to go, too.

It's hard to think of a. Hester Prynne The character of Hester Prynne changed significantly throughout the novel "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Hester Prynne, through the eyes of the Puritans, is an extreme sinner; she has gone against the Puritan ways, committing adultery. For this irrevocably harsh sin, she must wear a symbol of shame for the rest.

Hester has become a pariah through which the inner demons of the villagers are channeled. If The views of the villagers toward Hester Prynne change dramatically from the beginning toward the end of the novel.

The Scarlet Letter: Hester Prynne

For Hester, to remove the scarlet letter would be to acknowledge the power it has in determining who she is. The letter would prove to have successfully restricted her if she were to become a different person in its absence.

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The portrayal of hester prynne through the eyes of the puritans in the scarlet letter
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